Little Briarrose part 3

After long, long years, there came again a kings’ son to that country, and heard how an old man told about the briar hedge; that there was a castle behind it, in which a wonderfully beautiful king’s daughter called Briar Rose had been sleeping for a hundred years, and that the king and the queen and all the court were sleeping with her. He knew, too, from his grandfather that many kings’ sons had already come and tried to get through the briar hedge, but had all been caught in it and died a sad death. Then I lie young man said, “I am not afraid. I will go and see the beautiful Briar Rose.” The good old man might warn him as much as he pleased; lie did not listen to his words.

But now the hundred years were just passed, and the day was come when Briar Rose was to wake again. So when the king’s son went up In l lie briars, they were just great beautiful flowers that opened of their own accord and let him through unhurt; and behind him they closed together as a he

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Little Briarrose part 2

The king, who wanted to save his dear child from harm, sent out an order that all the spindles in the kingdom should be burned. But in the girl the gifts of the wise women were all fulfilled; for she was so beautiful, good, kind, and sensible, that nobody who saw her could help loving her. It happened that just on the day when she was fifteen years old the king and queen were not at home, and the little girl was left quite alone in the castle. Then she went wherever she pleased, looked in the rooms and chambers, and at last she got to an old tower.

She went up the narrow winding stairs, and came to a little door. In the keyhole was a rusty key, and when she turned it the door sprang open, and there in a little room sat an old woman with a spindle, and spun busily her flax. “Good day, Aunty,” said the king’s daughter; ‘What are you doing there?” “I am spinning,” said the old woman, and nodded.

“What sort of a thing is that that jumps about so gaily

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Little Briarrose part 1

Jakob Grimm (1775 – 1863) Wilhelm Grimm (1776 – 1859)

The Brothers Grimm, as they are still affectionately called, were both scholars of high repute, and both professors at the University of Berlin.

Though they contributed a great deal to the science of philology and the history of literature, their fame rests chiefly on their collections of folktales, issued under the title Children’s and Household Stories, in 1812 and 1814. These were the result of personal investigation and travel.

Little Briar Rose is only one of their many charming tales. It is to be observed that in the work of the Brothers Grimm the writers have molded each story with a conscious art: they are not to be classified as scientists, but artists.

The present version, anonymously translated, is reprinted from an undated London edition of the Tales of the Brothers Grimm.

Little Briarrose

(From Children’s and Household Stories)

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Little Briarrose part 3

After long, long years, there came again a kings’ son to that country, and heard how an old man told about the briar hedge; that there was a castle behind it, in which a wonderfully beautiful king’s daughter called Briar Rose had been sleeping for a hundred years, and that the king and the queen and all the court were sleeping with her. He knew, too, from his grandfather that many kings’ sons had already come and tried to get through the briar hedge, but had all been caught in it and died a sad death. Then I lie young man said, “I am not afraid. I will go and see the beautiful Briar Rose.” The good old man might warn him as much as he pleased; lie did not listen to his words.

But now the hundred years were just passed, and the day was come when Briar Rose was to wake again. So when the king’s son went up In l lie briars, they were just great beautiful flowers that opened of their own accord and let him through unhurt; and behind him they closed together as a he

Read More

Little Briarrose part 2

The king, who wanted to save his dear child from harm, sent out an order that all the spindles in the kingdom should be burned. But in the girl the gifts of the wise women were all fulfilled; for she was so beautiful, good, kind, and sensible, that nobody who saw her could help loving her. It happened that just on the day when she was fifteen years old the king and queen were not at home, and the little girl was left quite alone in the castle. Then she went wherever she pleased, looked in the rooms and chambers, and at last she got to an old tower.

She went up the narrow winding stairs, and came to a little door. In the keyhole was a rusty key, and when she turned it the door sprang open, and there in a little room sat an old woman with a spindle, and spun busily her flax. “Good day, Aunty,” said the king’s daughter; ‘What are you doing there?” “I am spinning,” said the old woman, and nodded.

“What sort of a thing is that that jumps about so gaily

Read More

Little Briarrose part 1

Jakob Grimm (1775 – 1863) Wilhelm Grimm (1776 – 1859)

The Brothers Grimm, as they are still affectionately called, were both scholars of high repute, and both professors at the University of Berlin.

Though they contributed a great deal to the science of philology and the history of literature, their fame rests chiefly on their collections of folktales, issued under the title Children’s and Household Stories, in 1812 and 1814. These were the result of personal investigation and travel.

Little Briar Rose is only one of their many charming tales. It is to be observed that in the work of the Brothers Grimm the writers have molded each story with a conscious art: they are not to be classified as scientists, but artists.

The present version, anonymously translated, is reprinted from an undated London edition of the Tales of the Brothers Grimm.

Little Briarrose

(From Children’s and Household Stories)

Read More

Little Briarrose part 3

After long, long years, there came again a kings’ son to that country, and heard how an old man told about the briar hedge; that there was a castle behind it, in which a wonderfully beautiful king’s daughter called Briar Rose had been sleeping for a hundred years, and that the king and the queen and all the court were sleeping with her. He knew, too, from his grandfather that many kings’ sons had already come and tried to get through the briar hedge, but had all been caught in it and died a sad death. Then I lie young man said, “I am not afraid. I will go and see the beautiful Briar Rose.” The good old man might warn him as much as he pleased; lie did not listen to his words.

But now the hundred years were just passed, and the day was come when Briar Rose was to wake again. So when the king’s son went up In l lie briars, they were just great beautiful flowers that opened of their own accord and let him through unhurt; and behind him they closed together as a he

Read More

Little Briarrose part 2

The king, who wanted to save his dear child from harm, sent out an order that all the spindles in the kingdom should be burned. But in the girl the gifts of the wise women were all fulfilled; for she was so beautiful, good, kind, and sensible, that nobody who saw her could help loving her. It happened that just on the day when she was fifteen years old the king and queen were not at home, and the little girl was left quite alone in the castle. Then she went wherever she pleased, looked in the rooms and chambers, and at last she got to an old tower.

She went up the narrow winding stairs, and came to a little door. In the keyhole was a rusty key, and when she turned it the door sprang open, and there in a little room sat an old woman with a spindle, and spun busily her flax. “Good day, Aunty,” said the king’s daughter; ‘What are you doing there?” “I am spinning,” said the old woman, and nodded.

“What sort of a thing is that that jumps about so gaily

Read More

Little Briarrose part 1

Jakob Grimm (1775 – 1863) Wilhelm Grimm (1776 – 1859)

The Brothers Grimm, as they are still affectionately called, were both scholars of high repute, and both professors at the University of Berlin.

Though they contributed a great deal to the science of philology and the history of literature, their fame rests chiefly on their collections of folktales, issued under the title Children’s and Household Stories, in 1812 and 1814. These were the result of personal investigation and travel.

Little Briar Rose is only one of their many charming tales. It is to be observed that in the work of the Brothers Grimm the writers have molded each story with a conscious art: they are not to be classified as scientists, but artists.

The present version, anonymously translated, is reprinted from an undated London edition of the Tales of the Brothers Grimm.

Little Briarrose

(From Children’s and Household Stories)

Read More