The Priest and the Mulberries part 2

“God!” said he, “if any one now should cry ‘Gee up!’ ” He thought and spoke the words at the same moment, whereat the mare was sud­denly frighted, and springing forward on the instant tumbled the luck­less priest into the bush where the thorns and briars grew sharpest and thickest. There he lay in that uneasy bed, nor might move from one side to the other, backwards or forwards, for all the money in the mint.

The mare galloped straight to her own stable, but when the priest’s household saw her return in this fashion they were greatly discomforted. The servants cursed her for an evil and a luckless jade, whilst the cook maid swooned like any dame, for well she believed that her master was dead.

When they were returned a little to themselves they ran to and fro, here and there, about the country searching for the priest, and presently on their way to the market town they drew near to that bush where their master yet lay in much misease. On hearing

Read More

The Priest and the Mulberries part 1

The Priest and the Mulberries

Anonymous: 12th or 13th Century

Practically nothing is known of the author of this pleasant little Fabliau. Compared with the great majority of surviving stories of its kind, it is remarkably free from the coarseness which characterizes the Fabliau, particularly when it deals with the clergy.

The present version is translated by Eugene Mason, in the volume Aucassin and Nicolette and Other Medieval Romances and Legends. Published in Everyman’s Library, J. M. Dent and Sons, by whose permission it is here reprinted. The title of the story in the original is The Priest Who Ate Mulberries.

The Priest and the Mulberries

A certian priest having need to go to market, caused his mare to be saddled and brought to his door. The mare had carried her master for two years, and was high and well nourished, for during these years never had she known thirst nor hunger, but of hay and of oats ever had she enough and

Read More

The Priest and the Mulberries part 2

“God!” said he, “if any one now should cry ‘Gee up!’ ” He thought and spoke the words at the same moment, whereat the mare was sud­denly frighted, and springing forward on the instant tumbled the luck­less priest into the bush where the thorns and briars grew sharpest and thickest. There he lay in that uneasy bed, nor might move from one side to the other, backwards or forwards, for all the money in the mint.

The mare galloped straight to her own stable, but when the priest’s household saw her return in this fashion they were greatly discomforted. The servants cursed her for an evil and a luckless jade, whilst the cook maid swooned like any dame, for well she believed that her master was dead.

When they were returned a little to themselves they ran to and fro, here and there, about the country searching for the priest, and presently on their way to the market town they drew near to that bush where their master yet lay in much misease. On hearing

Read More

The Priest and the Mulberries part 1

The Priest and the Mulberries

Anonymous: 12th or 13th Century

Practically nothing is known of the author of this pleasant little Fabliau. Compared with the great majority of surviving stories of its kind, it is remarkably free from the coarseness which characterizes the Fabliau, particularly when it deals with the clergy.

The present version is translated by Eugene Mason, in the volume Aucassin and Nicolette and Other Medieval Romances and Legends. Published in Everyman’s Library, J. M. Dent and Sons, by whose permission it is here reprinted. The title of the story in the original is The Priest Who Ate Mulberries.

The Priest and the Mulberries

A certian priest having need to go to market, caused his mare to be saddled and brought to his door. The mare had carried her master for two years, and was high and well nourished, for during these years never had she known thirst nor hunger, but of hay and of oats ever had she enough and

Read More